The Stanford Bubbles

As I was elected to be the Sloan Fellows representative to our school’s newspaper The GSB Reporter for this year and even though I have (see Herbert’s reflection on organizing our flash mob) and will be recruiting classmates to do most of the writing, I did submit an opinion below into the first issue that came out this week. Re-posting it here as getting the paper fully online is one of the priorities for the editorial team, but a work in progress. And for the non-local readers, have spiced the text up with some hyperlinks for background & context.

The Stanford Bubbles

The heat of the Summer quarter on campus, a luxurious head start the Sloan Fellows of GSB had this year left us a little space to ponder where have we landed. Walking one day between our campus lawns maintained exclusively with nail clippers, so lush green on the backdrop of deeply burned hillsides around The Dish it suddenly struck me:

We are truly living in a bubble here.

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Week 17: Economists Designing Orgs, Ethos of Problem-Making and Sick Bush in Japan

Stanford GSB Sloan Study Notes, Week 7 (17), Autumn quarter

This week will go down in history as the one that finally saw the portfolio of profiles of every single Fellow of the Stanford Sloans class of 2013 hit the public interwebs. Please meet my lovely class in its diversity, internationally and otherwise.

On other news, Americans re-elected Obama for their President (aka POTUS – didn’t know that one before) on Tuesday, which in the fair state of California sounded more like a sign of relief. And I, in turn, spent far too much time on Estonian blogs, chats and Facebook threads, tracking an insane sequence of judgement lapses by some party politics leaders back home. Between these two parallel world, I could not have had a better week to start a new class, Political Communications: How Leaders Become Leaders taught by a very experienced practitioner in the field, David Demarest.

Covered in this issue:

  • Why calling taxes “revenue enhancement” works
  • Why globalization and CxO executive titles should be taken less for granted than people think
  • How the classic forms of political communications, a speech and a debate, are constructed by the best
  • How 20-30 year old experimental art tends to turn into everyday products eventually
  • Necessary evils around good old software development: intangible assets, intellectual property, patents

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Weeks 15-16: Conglomerates, Lemmings, Founders’ Dilemmas and Tax Lotteries

Stanford GSB Sloan Study Notes, Week 5-6 (15-16), Autumn quarter

This post consolidates my notes from two weeks instead of a normal one, yet will be a bit more concise than usual too, for a few reasons: I was down with flu for several days and had to miss a few classes and then the midterm exams in Financial Accounting and Organizational Behaviour changed the normal scheduling.

Also, the first session of the latest addition in our core timetable, STRAMGT 259: Generative Leadership by Dan Klein yesterday was too… experiential to take any notes, really. Basically, we did three hours of improv theatre. It was a lot of fun, but instead of getting into the theory here – get the book: Improv Wisdom: Don’t Prepare, Just Show Up by Patricia Madson. And say “yes” more to whatever life throws at you, go with the flow and see what happens.

For additional entertainment, here is an experiment shared by my classmate Marc who is lucky to take a Behavioral & Experimental Economics class by freshly Nobel-prized Al Roth: primatologist Frans de Waal showing how even monkeys reject unequal pay (see especially from 2nd minute).

And now on to the regular programming. Covered in this issue:

  • Why people suck at predicting when they finish a task
  • How overdiversification, and especially uncontrolled aquisitions lead to dysfunctional conglomerates
  • Lemmings following lemmings, but not sheep
  • Predicting future divorces
  • Research from surveying 10,000 founders that quantifies the impact of common “gut decisions” like picking investors or sharing stock between co-founders
  • Guest speakers explaining how they’ve used creative incentive schemes to get more out of porn site classification crowdsourcing and VAT payments in China
  • The impact of investment lags on IP value creation in startups and established companies
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