Week 34: Al Gore, Startups Sales to Enterprises & Founders vs Early Employees

Stanford GSB Sloan Study Notes, Week 4 (34), Spring quarter

No bandwidth to say much more that you will find not one or two, but three beautiful graphs I drew this week with my two little hands below the fold. And that the sales game hinted towards last week concluded with a triple win by Sloan Fellows (who sold $4.1..$4.7M/each over a quota of $2.6M; among those your’s truly being #3).

The two View From The Top events this week were different but great – my notes won’t do them justice. As there is some lag in getting videos out you should just subscribe to the playlist and stay tuned.

Covered in this issue:

  • Visualizing social networks and Empirical demand modelling
  • Toyota’s unique manufacturing process
  • Startups selling products into huge companies
  • Compensation tuning for founders versus early employees
  • Tough conversations before, during and after letting an employee go
  • Guests: Al Gore, Co-CEOs (incl the original “Ari Gold from Entourage”) from William Morris Endeavor, Nuru International, KKR Capstone, Accel, EIR for New York, StudyBlue

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A Lot Of People Doing Wrong Things in Estonia

Manufacturing: Estonia VS Germany
An interesting graph from a presentation by Ott Pärna, CEO of Estonian Development Fund (see also my post from their recent event, in Estonian). Estonian & German industries being compared here by employment (left) and value added per manufacturing area.
One common characteristic we share is that there are a lot of areas where a large share of people is adding a tiny part of the value for country’s economy. However, it is quite concerning how tilted towards the bottom (= less value) is the distribution of Estonian workforce.
It would be very interesting to see service industries in different countries being compared in a similar way – such as the software, biotech, nanotech and other innovation/R&D fields we talk so much about. Anyone have a good pointer?
PS: most value in German manufacturing is added with oil, nuclear fuel and tobacco? Scary…