Week 21: Finance, Ventures, Stories and Space

Stanford GSB Sloan Study Notes, Week 1 (21), Winter quarter

The pace of the new year has been just mindblowing, and not just compared to the Christmas break down time but to almost any of the school weeks from previous quarters. I guess this is what happens when you can almost fully customize your class schedule. And you want to get out of GSB to “across the street” schools for a bit. And you get accepted to this year’s LOWKeynotes speaker series, with dozens of hours scheduled for prep-work and coaching before the big stage. And…

I’m saying “almost in control,” because I have had close to no time to spend with family, sleep over 6 hours or socialize these last five days. And I do intend to do those things this quarter too. Exhausted, happy, but realizing this kickoff pace will not be quite sustainable as is. Let’s see what next week brings with its reading volume and booting up several project groups.

Covered in this issue:

  • Finance basics: free cash flow, annuities, perpetuities & NPV calculations
  • Business planning: financial business modelling, life time value of customers, Dropbox freemium example
  • Venture Capital: industry history and sizing, how VCs think, how they move money and get paid
  • Marketing: stories, stories, stories – creating and delivering them (videos)
  • Strategy: Grabber-Holder model explaining disruptive tech innovation via ultimate nothingness from Taosim and Yin-Yang cycle
  • Space entrepreneurship: an inspiring event on synthetic life with the Student Space Flight club
  • Guest speakers throughout the week: Vinod KhoslaNancy DuarteCraig Hanson and John Cumbers

Read the rest of this entry »


Winter Quarter Courses

As the Sloan year has passed the equator, I’ve signed up for the following classes kicking off next week. It is going to be quite intense, 22 units in total and Mondays going from 8am to 9pm…

Core classes:

Yes, just two this time, leaving more precious time for electives.

Electives: Read the rest of this entry »


Weeks 18-20: Innovation Economy, Debate Blunders and Creative Computing

Stanford GSB Sloan Study Notes, Week 8-10 (18-20), Autumn quarter

Not to worry, despite of the three week scope in title this is not a monster-length post. Between a lovely wedding, an unexpected funeral and Thanksgiving break in between my focus has temporarily shifted a bit away from school as this quarter concludes. Do enjoy the little there is to share below – and as special gift to reader A.M., yes there are more videos.

Marc & Bill

A notable off campus educational highlight  last week ago was an event at A16Z where  William Janeway (being interviewed by Marc Andreessen on the photo above) discussed his book Doing Capitalism in the Innovation Economy: Markets, Speculation and the State. Combining his 40 years in venture capital with a PhD in Economics, Bill has great insights into when, how and where governments should play any role financing tech innovation and where progress should be left for markets. And as a curious subtopic – the need for an occasional bubbles in the latter case.

Covered further in this issue:

  • How to avoid small groups polarizing towards extremes in debate
    • Kõrvalmärkusena Eesti lugejaile: jah, teadus teemal Reformierakond VS Väike Grupp!
  • Centralization VS distribution of control in global organizations
  • More history of Presidential candidates screwing up in public
  • Financial ratios and common size reports in accounting
  • Effective networking tips’n’tricks exchange with Sloan classmates
  • How computing changes human bodies and the definitions of creativity
  • How big internet players have changed hardware IP value chain

Read the rest of this entry »


Week 17: Economists Designing Orgs, Ethos of Problem-Making and Sick Bush in Japan

Stanford GSB Sloan Study Notes, Week 7 (17), Autumn quarter

This week will go down in history as the one that finally saw the portfolio of profiles of every single Fellow of the Stanford Sloans class of 2013 hit the public interwebs. Please meet my lovely class in its diversity, internationally and otherwise.

On other news, Americans re-elected Obama for their President (aka POTUS – didn’t know that one before) on Tuesday, which in the fair state of California sounded more like a sign of relief. And I, in turn, spent far too much time on Estonian blogs, chats and Facebook threads, tracking an insane sequence of judgement lapses by some party politics leaders back home. Between these two parallel world, I could not have had a better week to start a new class, Political Communications: How Leaders Become Leaders taught by a very experienced practitioner in the field, David Demarest.

Covered in this issue:

  • Why calling taxes “revenue enhancement” works
  • Why globalization and CxO executive titles should be taken less for granted than people think
  • How the classic forms of political communications, a speech and a debate, are constructed by the best
  • How 20-30 year old experimental art tends to turn into everyday products eventually
  • Necessary evils around good old software development: intangible assets, intellectual property, patents

Read the rest of this entry »


Week 14: Confucius, Shrek, Devil’s Advocates and the Board

Stanford GSB Sloan Study Notes, Week 4, Autumn quarter

Covered in this issue:

  • How Confucius helps the Chinese to consume free MP3s
  • How a CEO is stuck between the Board and his team in a complex matrix of conflicting loyalties
  • How a side-effect of managing a few trillion dollars in your funds is the need to do a lot of board voting for your shares
  • How high-profile VCs can keep your loans in the bank and close your hires
  • How startups should tell their story the way seen in Shrek
  • How to make the devil’s advocate a resident part of participatory decision making culture
  • How citizens should break the government monopoly of environmental and pollution mapping

And here on to the full notes: Read the rest of this entry »


Toolkit for Quick’n’Dirty Country/Culture Research

Whenever you are planning to take your startup or a mature company to a new market, planning to export your products there or seeking to open a new office to plug into local talent pool, you always know it will somehow be different than back home. Some of this is quite intuitive, like guessing that the farther you go physically, culturally or linguistically, the larger the change in environment. An enormous amount of differences are more nuanced.

The smart thing to do, of course would be to turn to relevant locals and expats, anthropologists and culture researchers. Maybe even hire a dedicated consultants who have been there and done what you’ve about to. Yet, there is always some of the analysis you need to do yourself, either because you can’t afford the time or resources to get external help, or you just need to prepare before turning to them. As cultural differences are highly contextual, not all of them really matter for your case, but you need to do some thinking on what are the few things that really do, the least.

Years ago I ran a project to figure out where should Skype build our next engineering centre to support the needed hiring pace. We looked at 12 countries in mostly Central-Eastern Europe, drilled deeper on a final shortlist of four and settled on Prague, which has sine been a great part of the Skype product engineering family since and still growing. Despite of the successful outcome, it wouldn’t have hurt to have had a bit more structured understanding beforehand on how to compare all our options.

Hence the very compressed reference list below, of books, frameworks, country data sites and other notes. Meant not to excite any culture theory experts, but rather to provide a very quick’n’dirty toolkit for business people who need to think through an upcoming international move. Read the rest of this entry »


Week 12: Discounting the Future, SEC Investigations and Visiting Founders

Stanford GSB Sloan Study Notes, Week 2, Autumn quarter

Covered in this issue:

  • Rational decision making. Why and by how much discount the future?
  • In search for a strategic fit – those sweet moments when stars actually align for a while. Resulting competitive advantage that holds due to the complexity of interdependencies. Cases: CapitalOne (data driven mass-personalisation) and Lincoln Electric (super productive manufacturing).
  • Real-Life Ethics: Guest Michael Marks on being bullied by huge OEMs while Flextronics CEO. And should a SEC-inestigated company throw an innocent CFO over board to settle? Role of the board in backing the CEO.
  • Guest selling their story: Smule co-founders Jeff Smith & Ge Wang. Andrew Mason of Groupon.
  • Peer-organized public company valuation training.
  • Analysis of a persuasive argument: 1 man turning 11 jurors around in the 12 Angry Men movie. The case of Silicon Valley’s most effective networker.
  • Cash flow reporting. And intangible assets, especially software.

And here on to the full notes: Read the rest of this entry »